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Memory Lane 50 Years ago - 1971-72 Promotion Season - Match by Match - Friday 26 November - 7th consecutive League home win

Chris Powell's mate

First XI⭐
Joined
Aug 14, 2010
Messages
3,363
My father came down to uni in Twickenham to pick me up, and not knowing the exact route I took him through Richmond Town Centre on a Saturday afternoon by mistake!
We missed the first 10 minutes, but not the goals. I can see Bill Garner rising like a gazelle to head home at the Braemar Road end.
It turned out to be one of only a few I could make this season, exiled to studies as I was.
 

LBBlue

Manager⭐
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
3,170
Location
Rye Sussex
Friday night 29th October 1-0 Victory against Barrow.

The 4 previous matches against Barrow ended in defeat. Really we should have lost this one as well on the play. 2 more points would have kept them out of the bottom 4 in the year they didn't get re-elected to the League.

We were unchanged. They had failed to score in 9 of their 14 games and this was their downfall as they fell to a first half goal from Terry Johnson. Maybe the lads felt a bit of pressure from growing expectation.

Following the previous week's win at Brentford, the crowd of 12, 426 was the biggest of the season so far and the biggest since January 1969 when 12,849 saw us beat 3-1 Col U in the derby game.

This put us top of the table over night with a difficult game at 4th place Workington the next weekend. They had only lost 1 game in 15 so far.
 

sufc_statto

Newbie
Joined
Mar 22, 2013
Messages
45
Friday October 29, 1971 - Division 4
Southend Utd (1) 1 (Johnson 12')
Barrow (0) 0
Venue:
Roots Hall KO: 7.30
Attendance: 12,410

Southend Utd: J Roberts, R Ternent, A Smith, D Elliott, B Albeson, J Jacques, T Johnson, B Best, B Garner, G Moore, B Lewis. Sub: K Lindsay.
Barrow: H Thomson, B Patrick, D Storf, A Clarke, E Harrison, B Noble, D McKay, M Hollis, J Rowlands, I McDonald, E Garbett.

Match Report
So anxious were the Roots Hall crowd to hear the final whistle on Friday night that they whistled themselves almost hoarse. It was as close as that and the end came as a relief, writes Terry Waterman

United deserved the points and the margin was about right, but it was such a scrappy game full of errors and the crowd must have been very disappointed bearing in mind the fine form Blues have shown recently.

True Barrow are one United’s bogy teams – United had never taken a point from them before – but with United in the top four and Barrow in the bottom four, the Roots Hall crowd obviously hoped for an easy victory.

They must have thought it was on the way when the Blues took the lead after 12 minutes. It was a grand goal, too. A fine pass from Billy Best put Terry Johnson right through in the middle and he slipped the ball into the net as goalkeeper Harry Thompson moved out.

Up to this stage, and for about 10 minutes afterwards, the game was sprinkled with good football, most of it from the United, but for some unknown reason play deteriorated and became a chapter of errors, bad passing, niggling offences, poor shooting, the lot.

Dave Elliott and Gary Moore could not take control of the middle of the field and as a result the United struggled. The defence was far from steady and the attack nothing like as dangerous as on most occasions in recent weeks.

Midway through the second halt, the home crowd frequently urged the United to ”Wake up” and the senselessly childish toilet roll brigade made their presence felt from behind the Barrow goal. Thank goodness, the referee, Mr. M.V. Sinclair of Guildford, quickly had a warning broadcast that he would call the players off if there as any more paper throwing.

David Storf, the Barrow number three, and Eric Harrison, the Barrow, number fives were both booked as the sides continuously cancelled out each other’s moves before there was a great deal of danger.

United were guilty of starting an attack and then slowing it up badly as they moved into shooting range and often made too many passes when a shot might have paid dividends.

Billy Best missed a good chance after 26 minutes when he tangled with ‘keeper Thompson, managed to get the ball away but then hooked it wide. Eight minutes later Billy fired in a good shot which the ‘keeper saved on his knees.

Best first half efforts by Barrow came just before the interval when Derek McKay rose to a left wing corner and beat John Roberts to the ball which flew just wide of the upright, and soon after when McKay tried another header and the ball bounced on the top of the bar.

The visitors’ best efforts in the second half came when Roberts was called to make a point blank range save from McKay after another drive had been charged down, and when they tried to save the game in the closing minutes with an all-out raid which was only cleared after Ray Ternent had caused a lot of heart-stopping in his on penalty area.

Goalkeeper Harry Thompson as penalised for taking too many steps when harassed by Billy Best and United had a free-kick with the Barrow team lined up almost on their goalline. The ball was deflected wide for a corner which was swept nicely into the Barrow goal area but headed wide by Gary Moore.

The final whistle was a great relief to the vast majority of the 12,410 crowd.

League Table
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Chris Powell's mate

First XI⭐
Joined
Aug 14, 2010
Messages
3,363
And so this time, a gang of us travelled up from college in Twickenham, not least because one of our number had a brother playing for Barrow.

Alan Hollis's bro, Mick, provided the complimentaries, and afterwards in the bar, this is long before the Shrimpers set up, reckoned he liked sticking his foot in on the keeper 'just to see him dive over it every time he collected the ball."

Am still in touch with most of the lads who fetched up that night, including Alan, who reckons the football wear and tear on Mick sees him walking downstairs backwards to avoid the back and hip strain on a 70-something shouldering the rigours of lower-league football.
 
Joined
Mar 10, 2011
Messages
571
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Southend-on-Sea, United Kingdom, United Kingdom
Ok, own up, how many aged Zoners were part of the "the senselessly childish toilet roll brigade"
The following text is taken from the match programme against Bradford Park Avenue on the 14th April 1969 and is written under the title of CROWD BEHAVIOUR:- The Youth Section applaud the action of one Southend supporter who VOLUNTARILY cleared up the toilet rolls which had been thrown during the Aldershot game. The habit of toilet roll throwing" is a particular juvenile habit which must be stamped out at all costs. The above event happened after Billy Best scored his third goal of that particular match to complete another hat-trick in a 4-2 win on Easter Monday. I was the above person who collected the toilet rolls up that day, but most certainly NOT the person who threw it, I was a regular back in those days in the PAK and in the words of one of the policeman on duty behind us all that day he said "Nobbler" I did not see who threw it, but if you don't go over the wall and collect it all up now we are going to throw you out" (not guilty your honour).
Footnote:- The above match programme mentioned against Bradford Park Avenue was in fact the debut match attended by my good friends Brothers Bob and Stalky.
 

Billy Bests boot laces

President⭐
Joined
Nov 13, 2006
Messages
6,217
The Youth Section applaud the action of one Southend supporter who VOLUNTARILY cleared up the toilet rolls which had been thrown during the Aldershot game. I was the above person who collected the toilet rolls up that day, but most certainly NOT the person who threw it, I was a regular back in those days in the PAK and in the words of one of the policeman on duty behind us all that day he said "Nobbler" I did not see who threw it, but if you don't go over the wall and collect it all up now we are going to throw you out"
Presume you collected enough, to last at home for several weeks!.
 

CanveyCastle

Striker
Joined
Feb 4, 2021
Messages
254
We always got of the bus at The Plough on our way to Roots Hall . First port of call were the toilets in West Road and grab some bog rolls for the game .
That was the scene of my one and only arrest. I went in those toilets but there was no bog paper so I left a minute later into the arms of a policeman who accused me of looking for men .

I missed the match --- spent ages next door in Westcliff Police Station pleading my innocence.
 

westie

Exile from Cambridgeshire
Joined
Jul 5, 2010
Messages
350
The following text is taken from the match programme against Bradford Park Avenue on the 14th April 1969 and is written under the title of CROWD BEHAVIOUR:- The Youth Section applaud the action of one Southend supporter who VOLUNTARILY cleared up the toilet rolls which had been thrown during the Aldershot game. The habit of toilet roll throwing" is a particular juvenile habit which must be stamped out at all costs. The above event happened after Billy Best scored his third goal of that particular match to complete another hat-trick in a 4-2 win on Easter Monday. I was the above person who collected the toilet rolls up that day, but most certainly NOT the person who threw it, I was a regular back in those days in the PAK and in the words of one of the policeman on duty behind us all that day he said "Nobbler" I did not see who threw it, but if you don't go over the wall and collect it all up now we are going to throw you out" (not guilty your honour).
Footnote:- The above match programme mentioned against Bradford Park Avenue was in fact the debut match attended by my good friends Brothers Bob and Stalky.
Most of the PAK stood halfway up and towards the back of the North Stand. If you'd had tried to throw toilet rolls there was more chance of them hitting the roof!
 

sufc_statto

Newbie
Joined
Mar 22, 2013
Messages
45
Saturday November 06, 1971 - Division 4
Workington (3) 3 (Spratt 7', Helliwell 28', Tyrer 40')
Southend Utd (1) 1 (Johnson 20')
Venue: Borough Park, Workington. KO: 3.00
Attendance: 3,849

Workington: M Rogan, R Walker, J Ogilvie, A Tyrer, T Spencer, B Wood, D Helliwell, T Spratt, I Hopkinson, J Goodfellow, J Martin.
Southend Utd: J Roberts, R Ternent, A Smith, D Elliott, B Albeson, J Jacques, T Johnson, B Best, B Garner, G Moore, B Lewis. Sub: K Lindsey.

Match Report
It was probably just as well that Southend arrived back in Southend on Saturday in almost indecent haste after this defeat at Borough Park. With seats reserved for the players on the return flight which had carried their supporters to Cumberland, the party landed at Southend Airport less than four hours after the final whistle has gone. And that should be just about as long as anyone connected with the Blues would want to remember the game writes ALI SMIRK.

To say the least, it was far from being one of United’s better performances of the season. In fact, in many respects, it may have come very close to being one of their worst.

Their prospects of holding their own were reasonable if not rosy for no more than 20 minutes. This was the period when, after Tom Spratt had given Workington a seventh-minute lead. Blues fought back, equalised in the 20th minute through Terry Johnson then began to get into the game.

Spratt’s goal was belted in from the edge of the area as he latched on to a short pass from John Martin without being opposed. Johnson’s equaliser was the reward for persistence and tenacity, netting at the second attempt after Bill Garner had headed on a Dave Elliott throw-in.

For just a brief spell, the Blues followers must have had visions of at least a point at the end of 90 minutes, but the bubble was burst in the 28th minute. A bad mistake by goalkeeper John Roberts gifted Workington with the lead for the second time. From then on the home side never for one moment relaxed their grip.

Roberts had possession after collecting a Jimmy Goodfellow shot and was rolling the ball in the area prior to picking it up and clearing. To his own obvious consternation and the amazement of players and spectators alike, the ball suddenly rolled too far away from him. Dave Helliwell, lying handy and with bags of room to spare, accepted the opportunity gratefully as he stepped in to put the ball into the empty net.

A visibly deflated United continued to go through the motions but were plunged ever deeper into the depths of despondency five minutes before half-time when Workington increased their lead.

A cross from the right found Alan Tryer 20 yards out and he was so much on his own that he had time to pull down the ball before turning and smashing his shot into the top of the net.

Right on the interval, Joe Jacques was booked by Durham referee P.N. Willis for a tackle on Helliwell.

Two more bookings came in the second half. Martin for having a shot at goal after the whistle had gone for offside and Ray Ternent just before the end for a tackle on Helliwell.

In between these two incidents the only efforts of note were two individual bursts by Workington’s Martin which ended with shots going just wide and two United scoring attempts which nearly succeeded.

In the 75th minute, a Garner header from a Johnson centre was brilliantly pulled gown by goalkeeper Mike Rogan and eight minutes later a Gary Moore header from Bernie Lewis’s cross was cleared off the goal line for a corner.

This was not the United side which had been been beaten only once in their 11 previous games. There were too many opposition players allowed too much room around the edge of the penalty area. BIues never had control of the middle of the park and Johnson and Lewis were the only two attackers to threaten any real danger.

For the second game running, United failed to build up an worthwhile moves. Two passes were as many as could be expected and most of the time Blues created their own troubles by giving possession to the opposition.

This was all Workington required. They never stopped running and they never stopped grafting. Add one or two good ball-players and it produced a display which thoroughly satisfied the 3,849 spectators, their biggest Saturday gate of the season.

League Table
1636157290112.png
 

LBBlue

Manager⭐
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
3,170
Location
Rye Sussex
Saturday 6 November Defeated at Workington

Workington went into this game with only 1 defeat but only 5 victories and 9 draws from 15 games. They were 1 point and 1 place behind us.

They had a number of players Mike Rogan, Tommy Spencer, Tommy Spratt, Jimmy Goodfellow, Tony Geidmintis, John Ogilvie, Alan Tyrer, John Martin who had all played over 100 games for them -so a pretty settled side. They had only conceded 9 goals so far scoring 25 so this game was going to be very difficult at another of those places we didn’t do well with 3 draws and 3 defeats in 6 games.

Thus, it proved with a 3-1 defeat with the game1-1 at half time, Terry Johnson scoring again.

Workington finished the season in a creditable 6th place on 51 points scoring just 50 goals, failing to score in 7 out of 8 games in March /April

With 2 points for a win, the top 5 sides were within 1 point of each other - it was very competitive with a number of good sides.

3 home games coming up in the rest of November 2 in the League and the Villa cup tie.
 

Chris Powell's mate

First XI⭐
Joined
Aug 14, 2010
Messages
3,363
Saturday November 06, 1971 - Division 4
Workington (3) 3 (Spratt 7', Helliwell 28', Tyrer 40')
Southend Utd (1) 1 (Johnson 20')
Venue: Borough Park, Workington. KO: 3.00
Attendance: 3,849

Workington: M Rogan, R Walker, J Ogilvie, A Tyrer, T Spencer, B Wood, D Helliwell, T Spratt, I Hopkinson, J Goodfellow, J Martin.
Southend Utd: J Roberts, R Ternent, A Smith, D Elliott, B Albeson, J Jacques, T Johnson, B Best, B Garner, G Moore, B Lewis. Sub: K Lindsey.

Match Report
It was probably just as well that Southend arrived back in Southend on Saturday in almost indecent haste after this defeat at Borough Park. With seats reserved for the players on the return flight which had carried their supporters to Cumberland, the party landed at Southend Airport less than four hours after the final whistle has gone. And that should be just about as long as anyone connected with the Blues would want to remember the game writes ALI SMIRK.

To say the least, it was far from being one of United’s better performances of the season. In fact, in many respects, it may have come very close to being one of their worst.

Their prospects of holding their own were reasonable if not rosy for no more than 20 minutes. This was the period when, after Tom Spratt had given Workington a seventh-minute lead. Blues fought back, equalised in the 20th minute through Terry Johnson then began to get into the game.

Spratt’s goal was belted in from the edge of the area as he latched on to a short pass from John Martin without being opposed. Johnson’s equaliser was the reward for persistence and tenacity, netting at the second attempt after Bill Garner had headed on a Dave Elliott throw-in.

For just a brief spell, the Blues followers must have had visions of at least a point at the end of 90 minutes, but the bubble was burst in the 28th minute. A bad mistake by goalkeeper John Roberts gifted Workington with the lead for the second time. From then on the home side never for one moment relaxed their grip.

Roberts had possession after collecting a Jimmy Goodfellow shot and was rolling the ball in the area prior to picking it up and clearing. To his own obvious consternation and the amazement of players and spectators alike, the ball suddenly rolled too far away from him. Dave Helliwell, lying handy and with bags of room to spare, accepted the opportunity gratefully as he stepped in to put the ball into the empty net.

A visibly deflated United continued to go through the motions but were plunged ever deeper into the depths of despondency five minutes before half-time when Workington increased their lead.

A cross from the right found Alan Tryer 20 yards out and he was so much on his own that he had time to pull down the ball before turning and smashing his shot into the top of the net.

Right on the interval, Joe Jacques was booked by Durham referee P.N. Willis for a tackle on Helliwell.

Two more bookings came in the second half. Martin for having a shot at goal after the whistle had gone for offside and Ray Ternent just before the end for a tackle on Helliwell.

In between these two incidents the only efforts of note were two individual bursts by Workington’s Martin which ended with shots going just wide and two United scoring attempts which nearly succeeded.

In the 75th minute, a Garner header from a Johnson centre was brilliantly pulled gown by goalkeeper Mike Rogan and eight minutes later a Gary Moore header from Bernie Lewis’s cross was cleared off the goal line for a corner.

This was not the United side which had been been beaten only once in their 11 previous games. There were too many opposition players allowed too much room around the edge of the penalty area. BIues never had control of the middle of the park and Johnson and Lewis were the only two attackers to threaten any real danger.

For the second game running, United failed to build up an worthwhile moves. Two passes were as many as could be expected and most of the time Blues created their own troubles by giving possession to the opposition.

This was all Workington required. They never stopped running and they never stopped grafting. Add one or two good ball-players and it produced a display which thoroughly satisfied the 3,849 spectators, their biggest Saturday gate of the season.

League Table
View attachment 17500
Would love to know anyone who made that trip!
I was invited by a Millwall supporting mate to go to The Den and watch a live braodcast on screens of a game from Borough Park, circa 1965.
It was revolutionary at the time, and the grainy results less than perfect.
But going up in space with Captain Kirk seemed less of a trial than getting to Workington 50 years ago!
 

TSG

Schoolboy
Joined
Jul 21, 2008
Messages
68
Would love to know anyone who made that trip!
I was invited by a Millwall supporting mate to go to The Den and watch a live braodcast on screens of a game from Borough Park, circa 1965.
It was revolutionary at the time, and the grainy results less than perfect.
But going up in space with Captain Kirk seemed less of a trial than getting to Workington 50 years ago!
Yes, I was there! Can't remember the trip or much of the game, coach grimm I presume, but do recall my 15 year old self sitting in their old stand feeling sorry for myself at the loss, it was a long journey back!
 

LBBlue

Manager⭐
Joined
Sep 2, 2007
Messages
3,170
Location
Rye Sussex
Yes, I was there! Can't remember the trip or much of the game, coach grimm I presume, but do recall my 15 year old self sitting in their old stand feeling sorry for myself at the loss, it was a long journey back!

RAC route planner says 344 miles and 6hrs 6 mins. But 50 years ago the motorway network was still being built - so I guess probably an hour to an hour and a half longer plus stops. Didn’t the coach leave Friday evening to get there on time ?
 
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