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MK Shrimper

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 6, 2005
Messages
52,329
Random find from the Observer about our one time manager and England legend Bobby Moore. Apologies if this has been posted before but it's interesting IMO.

History will always consider Moore a managerial failure, and his record at Southend was unimpressive: relegated to the Fourth Division in his first season, barely staving off the humiliation of having to seek re-election to the Football League in his second, mid-table anonymity in his final year. But backroom disruption always left him facing an impossible job. When Moore joined, Southend had just been taken over by the Essex builder Anton Johnson, who had ambitions to turn it into a grand sporting club. Inviting a rugby league team, the Maidstone-based Kent Invicta, to share the Roots Hall stadium was one of his wheezes. But Johnson was short of both money and fans. Debts rose to £700,000 and even the fans' Christmas loan fund was purged of £70,000. At this point, the Serious Fraud Squad was called in. In December 1985, the Football League banned Johnson from any further involvement in football and he was later declared bankrupt with hundreds of thousands owed to creditors.

Moore's role in all this remains sketchy. His position as chief executive was seemingly titular under Johnson, as he was never implicated in any of the police or FA investigations; he went on to serve Vic Jobson, Johnson's successor as chairman. Indeed Moore, as much as anyone, could be credited with saving Southend. Not only was he left to unravel the mess left by Johnson, but he also stepped in as manager following the sacking of Peter Morris in February 1984. As if by accident his break into management had finally come.

'It must have been very stressful for Bobby working there,' says Stephanie Moore. 'They didn't know how they were going to pay the players. They'd get to the end of the week and somebody would say, "Oh, we've got a game tomorrow". Bobby was involved in all this other stuff , the last thing he was allowed to do was really pay much attention to the team. He was too busy trying to keep the club afloat.'

By the summer of 1985, Jobson was in full control of the club and, for the first time since Moore's arrival, there was some stability. Frank Lampard, another former West Ham player and the father of the current Chelsea star, became player-coach and there was money to sign new players. Lampard describes Moore as 'an excellent, excellent manager for the players', who never really lost his temper. If he did throw a tantrum, 'it didn't really look like him, it didn't have that same effect'.

Moore's grace on the football field had once exuded a natural authority, says Lampard - an 'aura', something you couldn't quite put your finger on. Instructing lesser players wasn't so easy. 'He would often talk about great players not making good managers because they played through instinct,' says Pearce. 'I don't think Bobby was ever going to be a football manager. He wasn't a success when he dabbled in it because he was a player of such great ability. I'm not sure he was able to coach players of poor ability and make them great players - or even better players.'

Moore's time at Southend ended with further backroom arguments. Jobson had already objected to Moore moving back to live in central London so that Stephanie would be closer to her workplace. Then they fell out over team selection. 'There were one or two players,' recalls Lampard, 'and Vic wanted them to play, but they weren't in the starting line-up. Bob was very hesitant about what to do about it. Once that happened, that was the end of me being there. I can't even remember whether Bob changed the team, but it left such a bad taste. Two weeks later, Bob left too. And that was it.'

When Moore left Southend in April 1986, it was effectively the end of his managerial ambitions. A couple of months later, he had a new job: as sports editor of Britain's newest tabloid, the Sunday Sport, a product of the technology-led expansion of press titles. Its owner, David Sullivan, had made his fortune from pornographic magazines.
 

Rob Noxious

Retro Supremo⭐
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He brought Richard Cadette to the club ... for that alone, I am very grateful.

ps good find, Paulie!
 
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Firestorm

Pedant
Joined
Oct 25, 2003
Messages
15,210
Location
Immersed in the accounts
I always thoughtMoore was a poor manager,but tbh the results show otherwise.
85/86 season we finished 9th in Div 4 , which given the turmoil of the previous couple of seasons was a good achievement. king Cadette got 25 goals that year too.

The public may have been a bit less charitable, our last two games that season, both at home , Rochdale 5-0 (Cadette hat trick, Glenny Penny and a rarity from Micky Engwell) and Port Vale 2-1 (another from Penny ) were watched by a TOTAL of 2840

Webby got promotion the next season with many of the same team, (the addition of Dave Martin and Martin Ling would have helped), RC getting 31 !!
 

choggy

Coach
Joined
Dec 10, 2006
Messages
561
Location
London
Great find! Bobby Moore wasn't much cop at all, half the time he didn't even bother turning up on matchdays. We were made pre-season favourites to go up in the 1985-1986 season, but after a solid start we crashed 3-0 away to Mansfield and started to slide down the table.

That 5-0 against Rochdale was the first game after Bobby was fired.
 

turkishm

Director
Joined
Feb 2, 2007
Messages
2,878
Location
Turkey
Bobby was also a bit of a drinker. I doubt as much as Ronnie W though.
I have had a drink with Bobby more than once, and yes he did like a pint or two, but a really nice guy no hairs and graces about him. His time at Roots Hall prehaps not a high point of his footballing life, but the stats show he wasnt that bad.
 
Joined
Jul 12, 2005
Messages
22,733
Location
Canvey Island
I have had a drink with Bobby more than once, and yes he did like a pint or two, but a really nice guy no hairs and graces about him. His time at Roots Hall prehaps not a high point of his footballing life, but the stats show he wasnt that bad.

No doubt Vitallis did for his barnet. :unsure:
 
Joined
Aug 13, 2005
Messages
895
Wasn't Kevin Lock along with Frank Snr part of the backroom boys, seem to remember the Kerfuffle of all the West Ham boys being brought in
 

weymouth_shrimper

Schoolboy
Joined
Mar 31, 2007
Messages
80
Bobby was also a bit of a drinker. I doubt as much as Ronnie W though.
I can remember waiting to go through the turnstiles at the North Bank when Bobby turned up and drove straight into the wall while parking, someone shouted out "looks like he's been drinking again"
 

Rob Noxious

Retro Supremo⭐
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
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I can remember waiting to go through the turnstiles at the North Bank when Bobby turned up and drove straight into the wall while parking, someone shouted out "looks like he's been drinking again"

I saw him at Westcliff Station after a terrible 0-0 draw v Scunthorpe circa Feb. '84. He was banned from driving at the time for that very reason.
 

Mick

Life President
Joined
Oct 28, 2003
Messages
10,091
I saw him at Westcliff Station after a terrible 0-0 draw v Scunthorpe circa Feb. '84. He was banned from driving at the time for that very reason.

On that basis Dick Bate would never have been allowed near a car !
 

devonexile

First XI
Joined
Oct 26, 2009
Messages
430
Location
exeter
I have had a drink with Bobby more than once, and yes he did like a pint or two, but a really nice guy no hairs and graces about him. His time at Roots Hall prehaps not a high point of his footballing life, but the stats show he wasnt that bad.

Jobson once said to me that if he needed to speak to Bobby, he always scheduled the meeting for the morning, as Moore was likely to be incapable after lunch. Still a great footballer though and a hell of a nice guy (Bobby that is not Jobson)
 

Thorpe Groyney

Open your mind
Joined
Nov 20, 2008
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Surely it's plain to see?
I think, by and large at the time, we as supporters were very good with Bobby Moore. Sure, there were the odd grumblings about team selections, performances, and results, but we all knew his hands were tied by the off-field shenanigans. Compared to the outrage that happens if we so much as lose as a single game nowadays it seems incredible that we accepted so much mediocrity.

I still have my Southend Invicta scarf knocking around somewhere. A pleasant way to spend a Sunday afternoon.
 

O's fan

Newbie
Joined
Aug 30, 2008
Messages
61
Location
Lundun, 'innit
He brought Richard Cadette to the club ... for that alone, I am very grateful.

No it was that slimey barry silkman who convinced cadette to join the shrimpers. Still better for cadette he did move, he'd never have scored 25 in his entire career at orient.
 

Rob Noxious

Retro Supremo⭐
Joined
Oct 23, 2008
Messages
7,364
Location
Penzance
He brought Richard Cadette to the club ... for that alone, I am very grateful.

No it was that slimey barry silkman who convinced cadette to join the shrimpers. Still better for cadette he did move, he'd never have scored 25 in his entire career at orient.

Yes, I'd heard it was the 'footballer's friend' who was instrumental in the move - a bit of an avuncular figure for 'King Richard' wasn't he? Just pleased that Mooro saw his potential too and that we got the best out of him in his two excellent years with us.
 

Napster

The Horse with no Name⭐
Joined
Oct 27, 2003
Messages
35,305
Location
The wilds of Kent
Actually, when I spoke to Richard Cadette a few years ago, he told me that Moore was the biggest reason he joined us, he actually said "world cup winner - wouldnt you join?"
 

Tangled up in Blue

Certified Senior Citizen⭐
Joined
May 24, 2004
Messages
31,141
Location
Sant Cugat del Vallès
He brought Richard Cadette to the club ... for that alone, I am very grateful.

No it was that slimey barry silkman who convinced cadette to join the shrimpers.

I'll get stick for this I'm sure but I quite liked Silkman in his (short) time with us as a player.He had- ahem- silky skills.
A noted boozer himself he was often to be seen at the Aristocrat and other venues in the town.
 
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