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DoDTS

The PL League Boss⭐
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Here we are it’s DoDtS’s summer saga. Totally non football related, but my attempt to understand how and what our forebears had to endure through the war in a series of extracts from the Southend Standards of the times. Not everybody’s cup of tea but if your not interested then don’t read it. Next episode in a couple of days.

Episode 1 - 1915 to 1936 Southend Preparing for War

It is hard to understand how important Southend was as a seaside resort pre-war, however the town was scarred by the memory of one of the first air raids in the country in May 1915. A huge Zepplin airship flew over the town with the crew throwing incendairy bombs over the side by hand. The airship moved downriver but was turned back by defences at Thames Haven so they returned to Southend and deposited the rest of their bombs on the Southenders below. There were fatalities, casualties and a lot of damage and the memory lingered with the local population and the opinion that “Southend would be bombed to pieces”or would be “Hitlers invasion point” was a common feeling both locally and nationally.

On the 16th July 1935 as a show of strength THE HOME FLEET VISITED SOUTHEND. As part of King George Vs Silver Jubilee celebrations the home fleet, some 160 warships moored in the Thames Estuary off of Southend, they were quite an attraction and at night the ships were illuminated. Yet the Southend Corporation seemed oblivious to the dangers ahead.

Corporation visit to Germany
After a few hours of thinking and talking in the atmosphere of the new Germany, after seeing many of the Nazi institutions working and after hearing the views and aspirations of men who are intent on the material and spiritual reconstructions of their Fatherland we seemed to be very far removed from Southend and the rest of England. The Burgermeister of Frankfurt in a brief speech thought it right to say that the great British and German nations who had been so close together for many years and had only crossed swords once for the first time in their history should again find themselves friends and realize that the blood in their veins was much the same.
From the Southend Standard 10th October 1935

FASCISTS AND THE NEXT ELECTION
“We Shall Contest it with Considerable Success” - We intend to contest the next election and contest it with considerable success said the officer in charge of London propaganda for the British Union of Fascists at a meeting at the Cavendish Hall Westcliff on Wednesday.
From the Southend Standard 6th February 1936

GAS MASKED TROOPS IN NIGHT “ATTACK”
Great Wakering arose from it’s slumbers on Thursday night by a rumbling noise like continual thunder. The 6th Howitzers and Dragoons using caterpillar wheeled tractors conveying gas masked troops going into action. In view of modern weapons and observation Army training will be generally by night, by coincidence there was a similar training exercise was carried out at Sutton the same night.
From the Southend Station 7th May 1936.

R.A.F. STATION AT CANEWDON
About 18 acres of land at Canewdon has been acquired by the air Ministry for use as a wireless station.
From the Southend Station 7th May 1936.

LONDON ANTI-AIRCRAFT DEFENCES
The War office announces that three anti-aircraft batteries and seven anti-aircraft companies will be raised in addition to the extra anti-aircraft companies authorised in October.
From the Southend Standard 19th November 1936

ANGRY CROWD AT FASCIST MEETING
A hostile crowd of about 300 demonstrated throughout a Fascist meeting held in Elmer Approach on Saturday night The police had ordered that the meeting be held at the far end of the Approach rather than the High Street end. The speaker wearing a Fascist uniform spoke into a microphone on the top of a van and endeavoured to overcome the booing and singing of the crowd. The Fascists numbered about fifty mostly came down from London in a van fitted with thick mica instead of glass and covered with barbed wire, they were completely surrounded by Police and other police kept a gap of some yards between them and the crowd. A further detachment of Police waited at the Astoria cinema in case of emergency. The Police outnumbered the Fascists.
From the Southend Standard 3rd November 1936


This has also been posted on the Sarfend.co.uk website
 

DoDTS

The PL League Boss⭐
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Episode 2 - 1937 to 1938 Blackouts and the European Crisis

The largest “Black-out” experiment to be made in England will take place early in November, from Midnight on November 4th to 2 a.m. on November 5th and Southend will be one of the principle places in the area. During the “black-out” a mimic air raid will take place. Sirens are to give a warning just before midnight of the approach of the raiders searchlight and anti-aircraft batteries will be at their posts and the R.A.F. machines ready to engage in combat.
From the Southend Standard 7th October 1937.

There were thirteen mock air raid fires staged in and around the Borough of Southend and to these the engines dashed with most commendable precision. The alarms of fire warnings were brought in by the Corps of Volunteers messengers first on their cycles from the scene of the fire to the fire picket and first aid posts and thence motor cyclists to the intelligence headquarters. Outside the Air Raid Precautions Office in Warrior Square and on the steps were numerous casualties, some were bandaged and being bundled off to hospital while others were receiving first aid and lying on the pavement.
From the Southend Standard 11th November 1937

AIR RAID PRECAUTIONS
Instructions for L.M.S. staff. During the past fortnight considerable interest has been taken in a mustard coloured van which has been standing at No. 6 platform at the L.M.S. station Southend but the initials on the side “A.R.P.” disclosed its purpose. Every day the van has been used for instructing volunteers from the staff in air-raid drill and precautions. And the van will remain until each man has undergone a five day course.
From the Southend standard January 1938

LABOUR UNITES FOR MAY DAY
Demonstration at Southend. “Arms for Spain” demands. A procession a mile long representative of the Labour and Trade Union movement in Southend and district on Sunday with lorries with tableaux, banners, slogan placards a band and children’s choir, caricatures of Hitler, Mussolini and leaders of the National Government. Trade Union banners, red flags, fifty anti war placards borne aloft on big poles gave colour to the procession.
From the Southend Standard 5th May 1938

THAMES AREA BLACK OUT
Southend will once again play one of the principal parts in the second of the Nore command air raid exercises which are being planned for Tuesday May 31st that include both day and night raids. A considerable number of aircraft will fly over the area during both raids. Air Raid Shelters - letters have been addressed to Hotels, Public Houses etc. with the provision of shelters, and anyone that has a cellar which could be suitable should get in touch with the Air Raids Precautions Officer.
From the Southend Standard 12th May 1938

A.R.P. SMOKE SCREEN EXPERIMENT
Another smoke screen experiment in connection with air raid precautions is to be made somewhere in Essex. The experiment is to demonstrate what extent smoke screens can be used to hide objects on the ground from air attack. The screen will probaly cover an area of several square miles and the cloud will probably last about an hour. “The smoke used will be perfectly harmless” the B.B.C. stated “but it is thought that people might want to know of the experiment so that they can close their windows”.
From the Southend Standard Septemeber 1938.

GERMAN PLANE OVER SOUTHEND
Many people in Southend observed a German aeroplane pass over the town about 4.30 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon it was first noticed at Shoeburyness where it approached in a westerly direction from the sea flew over the garrison and then followed the coast to Southend. It was at a height of about 400 to 500 feet and continued on towards Leigh following the London Road. Shoebury garrison would make no observation of the arrival of the machine.
From the Southend Standard 1st September 1938

THE EUOPEAN CRISIS
Southend and the whole of South East Essex has during the present week concerned itself almost wholly with preparations to deal with a national emergency should it arise. On Wednesday a European war looked inevitable the position seemed almost desperate but the dramatic announcement by Neville Chamberlain shortly after four o’clock in the afternoon gave everyone fresh hope that peace may be preserved. After an all day sitting the Town Council Air Raid Precautions Committee issued three important communications dealing with the distribution of civilian respirators, the evacuation of schoolchildren and general information and advice to the public. The public were advised to go to the nearest school from Sunday onwards for gas-mask fitting and the Air Raid Precautions organization entered upon it’s final preliminary work of protecting residents. Up to Wednesday night it was estimated that about 100,000 of the town’s estimated population of 140,000 had been fitted for respirators and distribution of these will commence. In the event of an outbreak of hostilities schools are being closed and parents have been approached with a view to their consent to the removal of their children to another area. This area has not been specified.
From the Southend Standard 29th September 1938.
 

DoDTS

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Episode 3 - 1938 to 1939 WAR DECLARED

A.R.P. RECRUITING WEEK
The A.R.P. recruiting campaign that was held last week resulting in a steady enrolment of volunteers. At the beginning of the week at least 3,000 volunteers were required to make up the minimum strength essential and over 1,000 of these have now responded.
From the Southend Standard 13th October 1938

GOVERNMENTS EVACUATION PLANS
The system by which England and Wales have been divided for the purpose of evacuation is given in a list drawn up by the Ministry of Health.
From the Southend Standard 12th January 1939

1¼ MILLION SANDBAGS NEEDED
The county architect stated that it would seem approximately 1,595,300 sandbags will be required for Hospitals in the county if buildings will have to be sandbagged to a height of eight feet wide at the base and two feet at the top. However he did not state who was going to pay for it. The sand to fill the bags for Chelmsford hospital would cost £872 and would require 664 five ton lorry loads of sand and the figure mentioned did not include labour.
From the Southend Standard 27th April 1939

AIR RAID SHELTERS – COUNCIL TO UNDERTAKE SURVEY
The Council have under consideration the policy of the Government as to the provision of air raid shelters consisting of three main parts, vis: (1) Shelter for employees at their place of work (2) shelter for persons at home or adjoining the home and (3) public shelters whether in basements in trenches or in other forms of structure for persons caught in the streets and persons for whom no private shelter can be made available. The circular points out that the execution of this policy is limited to certain specified areas of which Southend is one. Anderson shelters are to be distributed free to those that are eligible, that is those whose occupations are compulsory or those on earnings or pensions under £250.
From the Southend Standard 18th May 1939

ESSEX AND NATIONAL SERVICE
The intensive activity of the Essex National Service Committee during the last two weeks has met with gratifying results.
From the Southend Standard 18th May 1939

TO THE WOMEN OF SOUTHEND
Since the appeal of the 23rd March 1,600 women have enrolled in the Women’s Voluntary Services for civil defence. Volunteers are still needed particularly required for the following: (1) Women ambulance drivers both car owners and others who can drive a car, (2) Messengers both cycle and foot, (3) Air raid wardens, (4) Nursing auxiliaries and first aid, (5) Blood donor volunteers who are asked to register their names at the W.V.S. offices.
From the Southend Standard 27th July 1939

The Seafront Commandeered for War Duty
Southend Pier became a first line of defence and an essential link to the Naval Fleets in the Estuary, the Navy took over the Pier on 25th August 1939, and the Pier closed to the public on 9th September 1939 and took up its role as becoming part of HMS Leigh, a name given to the seafront area commandeered by the Royal Navy and included properties on Royal Terrace as well as the Grand Pier Hotel. (Note: for the duration of the War. 84,297 ships, in 3,367 convoys, sailed from the Pier)

PLANS IN THE EVENT OF WAR
In anticipation of war various schemes were either being implemented or being planned. The Sandbagging of Public buildings was in hand, the first delivery of Anderson shelters had arrived in Southend and council officials were out canvassing residents to see who was entitled to them. The Railways stations had been sandbagged and the trains on the L.N.E.R. had been fitted with blue lights, the fire brigade had been out painting arrows near fire hydrants so they could be found more easily in the blackout. Southend was designated an area to be evacuated while Rochford was an area to accept evacuated children and plans were well in hand. Shops were given instructions on how to make internal lights invisible from outside in the event of the blackouts and residents informed that food supplies would be unaltered at the moment and while they shouldn’t indulge in excessive buying it would be a good idea to build up a store of essential goods.
Précised from the Southend Standard 31st August 1939.

WAR DECLARED
After Germany rejects the Anglo-French ultimatum of 1st Sept, which called for the withdrawal of all German forces from Poland, Britain declares war on Germany at 11a.m. on the 3rd September 1939. In Britain, general mobilisation is declared. and the National Service Act passed.
 
Joined
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So unreal to read but so real to the adults that lived through it,my dad was 9 at the start of the war and said as a kid it was a fun time to live in upminster.
 

DoDTS

The PL League Boss⭐
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So unreal to read but so real to the adults that lived through it,my dad was 9 at the start of the war and said as a kid it was a fun time to live in upminster.

Yes hard to beleive that this was our Southend, the kids had great fun loved playing with live ammunition, like taking an unexploded bomb and chucking it off a garage roof to try and make it explode, but I'm getting ahead of myself all to come in future episodes!
 

DoDTS

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Episode 4 - 1939 War Preparations, threats but little action in Southend

SOUTHEND IN WAR ATMOSPHERE
The declaration of war on Germany on Sunday morning was followed by the intensification of A.R.P. activity such as Southend has never seen before, through sandbagging buildings, erecting sandbags shelter and strengthening basements had been busily proceeding for some days previously. During Friday nights black-out the streets wore a strange air, with cars moving about at reduced speed by the light only of dimmed side lamps and trams in darkness save for a few heavily shaded lamps. Large numbers of pedestrians were about the streets in spite of the difficulty of moving about and many accidents were reported.
From the Southend Standard 7th September 1939

MOTOR CYCLIST KILLED
A young motor cyclist’s death following a collision in Victoria Avenue on the first night of the “black-out”. The coroner returned a verdict of accidental death and exonerated the driver of the van involved with the accident and said it was the first case he had had due to the darkened conditions of the street. He added “I fear it won’t be the last”.
From the Southend Standard 14th September 1939

On Wednesday 19th September 1939 the first British casualty list was published. and the Southend Standard started it’s weekly roundup of the war news which depressingly started to have items on local people involved in the conflict, injured or killed.

ISSUE OF BABIES RESPIRATORS
The special type of respirators for babies up to the age of two years was issued from 22 elementary schools of the Borough on Tuesday and Wednesday. The respirators are in the form of a bag fitted to a steel framework and provided with a window, where the child’s head rests is padded, and a rubber skirt is attached to the lower part of the body. Air is pumped into the bag by an attachment at the side operated by an adult.
From the Southend Standard 12th October 1939

New Anti-Aircraft Battery for Southend
To be Recruited Exclusively Locally A new light anti aircraft battery, is to be formed in Southend. Applications for enlistment are invited from men aged between the ages of 29 and 50 who are not in reserved occupations.
From the Southend Standard 12th October 1939

A.R.P. SHELTERS FLOODED
Serious concern has arisen amongst A.R.P. personnel who have been on duty at sandbag posts or underground dug outs due to the number s that have been rendered untenable because of water seeping through. The shelters may give protection from bomb splinters but they have not been able in several cases to withstand heavy rains.
From the Southend Standard 12th October 1939

FAMILIES OF THE FORCES
From all parts of the country complaints are being made concerning the disparity between the present Services allowances and former civilian income. Numbers of families have commitments out of all proportion to their existing reduced income and as a result debts are accumulating and hardship arising.
From the Southend Standard 26th October 1939

RATION BOOKS READY
The position at Southend, after working at high pressure a large temporary staff has completed the scheme for distributions of ration books for the area. When the books are issued they will be sent to the addresses given on the night of National Registration.
From Southend Standard 26th October 1939

THREATS TO SOUTHEND
One of the latest forms of evening amusement for wireless listeners is to switch on and listen to the broadcasts from Hamburg and Cologne. The ridiculous nature of the claims and assertions made are really as good as listening to a rollicking farce. For weeks we have been regaled with stories of starvation in England scarcity of butter and meat and how Mr. Churchill sank the “Athena” and blamed the Germans. We also heard several weeks ago of how Chatham had been bombed and the neighbouring town of Southend was in flames when as a matter of fact not a bomb had been dropped on either place. During the past week we have heard from Hamburg a series of threats directed towards this part of the east coast. In one message it was stated that Essex and especially Shoeburyness would be next marked down for attention for air raids and bombing. On Saturday the announcer with an Oxford accent gave a little more definite information and addressed a personal word to Southend people indicating that it had been a boast of Southend people in the past that Southend possess the longest pier in the world but believe me he added “by Monday afternoon I can assure you it will be the shortest”. The reply to the German boast is that Southend is still intact with it’s pier still in the same place as it has always been.
From the Southend Standard 26th October 1939

“Germany Calling” was the German Propaganda broadcast sent out on the Medium Wave to England it started on the 18th September 1939 and had various well spoken announcers all of whom were given the nickname of” Lord Haw Haw”.
 

RobM

55 years as a supporter!⭐
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Not local but the story of Tyneham in Dorset is a sad one. Essentially the MOD comandeered the village before the was started and hace yet to give it back. Check it out.
 

OldBlueLady

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Enjoying it all so far DoDtS, my parents were both born just before the war, mum was evacuated to East Hoathley in West Sussex while my dad remained in Southend. His dad was an ARP warden.
 

DoDTS

The PL League Boss⭐
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Not local but the story of Tyneham in Dorset is a sad one. Essentially the MOD comandeered the village before the was started and hace yet to give it back. Check it out.

Great shame a bit like Foulness, so is no public access alowed to Tyneham at all?

DoDtS
 

OldBlueLady

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Great shame a bit like Foulness, so is no public access alowed to Tyneham at all?

DoDtS
Just read up on this, Tyneham isn't the only village but it seems to have more accessibility than some, for most of August there is access to it. There's also Imber in Wiltshire and several villages in Norfolk near Thetford (and where they filmed a lot of Dad's Army). The residents seem to have been poorly compensated and there's some pretty sad stories about some of the villagers. Both Imber and Tyneham were commandeered in 1943 though, so not before the war.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyneham

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imber

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_Battle_Area
 

RobM

55 years as a supporter!⭐
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Essex of course!
You can get to the village but there's not much there - the best bit is a "Push button B" phone box! It's a beautiful place though - although access is a bit limited because of MOD tank testing. Well worth a visit purely for the nostalgia, really.

OBL - my mistake, yes you're right. So it's virtually 70 years since MOD took the village. Maybe someone had been born outside the village and since died - without ever living "at home".
 

DoDTS

The PL League Boss⭐
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You can get to the village but there's not much there - the best bit is a "Push button B" phone box! It's a beautiful place though - although access is a bit limited because of MOD tank testing. Well worth a visit purely for the nostalgia, really..

Thanks for the tip \I go to Dorset quite a lot I'll check it out next time I go.

DoDtS
 

DoDTS

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Episode 5 - 1939-1940 THE PHONEY WAR, MAGNETIC MINES AND DUNKIRK

RATION BOOKS Southend’s issue of ration books is now in progress. THE RECRUITING OFFICE Many visualize the Southend Recruiting Centre as a bare draughty guard-room with a stentorian voiced sergeant receptionist but that is not the case. The recruit is firstly interviewed by an official in ordinary civilian clothes.
From the Southend standard 9th November 1939

“WELL LOOKED AFTER”
Trooper H Ellis who is in France writes to thank the Southend United Supporters Club for sending him cigarettes. He was the first one in his regiment to receive anything from a football club. He would like the people of Southend to know that all the troops are well looked after.
From The Southend Standard 30th November 1939

THE PHONEY WAR
The war was given the nickname of a “phoney war” as since war had been declared many expected a major calamity but it appeared that nothing had actually happened. The blackout had been strictly adhered to children evacuated but little had occurred and the only consequence of the blackout was an increase in road accidents. In reality much was happening, Poland was in the process of being occupied ships were being sunk although some of the bad news wasn’t made public in Britain. The lord Haw-Haw broadcasts although largely treated as light entertainment or a joke, sometimes were the first to reveal some of the news. In reality a lot of preparation for war was taking place and this period was the calm before the storm.

MAGNETIC MINE FOUND OFF SHOEBURYNESS
At 10.00 p.m. on the night of the 22nd November 1939 there was activity in the air seaplanes were seen overhead and it was not till all the activity had died down that the all clear was sounded without any material damage, but some residents claimed they saw objects being dropped into the sea. A German magnetic mine was found in the mud flats off of Shoeburyness. At the time it was not known when or if it would explode and the team of experts that were employed to investigate the mine did so with extreme bravery and danger to themselves. Pictures of the mine were taken by a Southend Standard photographer, and the mine was carefully and at great risk, disarmed. All this was done in great secrecy and the dismembered engine of destruction was loaded and taken to Portsmouth for investigation and two days later it was announced that magnetic mines had been dropped in the Thames Estuary. The mines had a new type of arming mechanism inside and only when this was fully understood and methods of mine-sweeping in operation was the full story told.

INFANTS BACK AT SCHOOL
When the elementary schools of the Borough of Southend resumed parents now have the assurance that adequate air raid shelters are available. Group teachings at Halls or other buildings have ceased and at the present moment two thirds of infants are receiving half time or more instruction at their local school.
From the Southend Standard 16th May 1940

CHILDREN BEING MOVED
The Government have decided as Holland and parts of Belgium and Northern France are now in enemy occupation arrangements are being made for those children in the Southend area whose parents wish them to go to be sent from these areas to safer districts in the Midlands. The movement will start by special trains leaving next Sunday. With only just over forty eight hours to work the Education Department at Southend has registered roughly 8,500 children about 62 per cent of the child population of the town. With teachers and helpers it means that when the evacuation begins some 9,300 adults and children will embark for the reception areas.
From the Southend Standard 30th May 1940.

1st June 1940 All signposts which might be helpful to parachutists landing in Britain were taken down.

LOCAL LOSSES AT DUNKIRK
When the full story is written of the evacuation of Dunkirk under terrific from bombardment by guns and planes a chapter can be included of the part played by boats from the Southend shore. Casualties included the Leigh cockle Bawley “RENOWN” a vessel owned by the Osborne brothers, who was blown to pieces it’s four occupants lost. The skipper of the vessel “Letitiia” stated afterwards “There was a terrific explosion when we looked back nothing could be seen of the Renown”. The “CRESTED EAGLE” the well known local pleasure steamer “Crested Eagle” was ablaze from stern to stern after being struck by three German bombs and was run aground near Dunkirk. A survivor said “we had just tied up to the pier at Dunkirk when the raiders came over. We were lucky but they got a destroyer near us after that the raiders made off and we loaded the troops and got about a quarter mile out from the pier then about a dozen raiders came back and attacked us. The din was terrific and bombs were falling all around the ship. The first bomb fell on the forward part of the ship, the second put the engines out and the third hit the bridge we were alight so the captain did the only thing he could, run aground so that we didn’t block the main channel”.
From the Southend Standard 6th June 1940
 

DoDTS

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Episode 6 - EVACUATION

SOUTHEND’S SCHOOLCHILDREN SAY “GOOD-BYE”
Before the sun had risen on Sunday the first of Southend’s 8,500 children to be evacuated were on their way to their schools and later at half hourly intervals from 7 a.m. long heavily laden trains steamed out of the central L.M.S. station on route to the Midlands. Tiny tots struggling with rucksacks or suitcases, junior boys and girls, High school and Technical students in long “crocodiles” they marched from the marshalling ground in the station yard to the barriers and then along the platform as each train drew in. A ceaseless procession of Westcliff motor buses carried the children from the schools to the station where members of the Education Department, nurses, First Aid party workers and helpers shepherded them into their allotted places. The whole evacuation was a triumph and the trains were always ready to leave at the scheduled time. The dispersal reached from Stockport to Chesterfield. With the majority of the schools and the whole of the teaching staffs away, the schools have been closed. The problem of those who remain has, however, still to be dealt with. They must number from 3,000 to 4,000. Doubtless steps will be taken as soon as possible for, whatever may be the opinion concerning the parents action in deciding that their children shall remain here, it is to be hoped that the education of the little ones will not be allowed to suffer.
From the Southend Standard 6th June 1940

BOMBINGS
Salvo of Bombs During air raids on the Thames Estuary enemy planes were over Essex and a salvo of four high-explosive bombs were dropped. Enemy aircraft were again over the area on Tuesday night and about a dozen high explosive bombs were dropped in an area where there have previously been bombs dropped. Anderson Shelters Save Many People – German Airmen Captured. - The bombs were dropped by planes that formed a formation of 54 machines which had attempted to fly up the River Thames and which were headed back by a terrific anti-aircraft barrage. At the same time another formation of 42 machines that crossed the coast further north was also turned back by R.A.F. fighters and one of their number was shot down. About 180 bombs were scattered over a large area and many miraculous escapes from death were recorded. Bomb Trail Across Town Two Dead and Property Damaged – The only shop to be occupied of those under a big block of flats erected in a South-East town was subject to a direct hit during a daylight raid when a formation of twenty-one enemy bombers flew across the town from south to north. The Trail of the bombs started on the foreshore. When the aircraft turned back more bombs were dropped as the raiders made for the sea having encountered heavy anti aircraft fire
From the Southend Standard June/September 1940

BACK FROM DUNKIRK
Upwards of twenty Southend pleasure craft which were commandeered for the Dunkirk evacuation and on Monday the first of these was brought back to it’s moorings. As a result of the heavy seas and surf the continual towing and rough handling considerable damage was done.
From the Southend Standard 20th June 1940

WELCOME TO SOUTHEND EVACUEES
All the evacuees at Ripley are from the Hamstel School and in the fortnight they have been there they have attended half time with educational walks to fill in the other half of their days.
From the Southend Standard 20th June 1940

SOUTHEND HOSPITALS EVACUATED
In accordance with home defence precautions all Hospitals within a certain distance of the coast are being evacuated and on Friday every patient fit to travel was sent away from the Southend General hospital and the Southend Municipal Hospital. They left for hospitals in the Cambridge area.
From the Southend Standard 27th June 1940

500 MORE CHILDREN EVACUATED
The supplementary evacuation scheme of schoolchildren from the borough of Southend was carried out on Tuesday morning some 500 being sent by special train from the L.N.E.R. station to join the 9,000 already distributed amongst the Midland areas
From the Southend Standard 27th June 1940

PEOPLE CONTINUE TO LEAVE
Since it was announced on Saturday week that assistance is available for persons who wish to remove from Southend but lack the means to do so. The committee are now dealing with about twenty five persons per day, most of these are given a railway pass and in cases where necessary a billeting allowance of about 5s a week (3s per child).
From the Southend standard 11th July 1940
 

OldBlueLady

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I'll have to ask my dad what he did for school staying in town, ok, he was only a toddler when war broke out but he'd have been 7 or 8 by the end of it. I know at Westcliff High for Girls, there used to be 3 or 4 huge canvas pictures of the girls on their evacuation at Chapel in the Frith in Derbyshire. Wonder if they're still there.
 
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I'll have to ask my dad what he did for school staying in town, ok, he was only a toddler when war broke out but he'd have been 7 or 8 by the end of it. I know at Westcliff High for Girls, there used to be 3 or 4 huge canvas pictures of the girls on their evacuation at Chapel in the Frith in Derbyshire. Wonder if they're still there.

I doubt it most of them would be dead by now.
 
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I'll have to ask my dad what he did for school staying in town, ok, he was only a toddler when war broke out but he'd have been 7 or 8 by the end of it. I know at Westcliff High for Girls, there used to be 3 or 4 huge canvas pictures of the girls on their evacuation at Chapel in the Frith in Derbyshire. Wonder if they're still there.

My Mothers side of our family were still in London and did not move to Southend until after my Uncle Jim was killed at Caen in July 1944. Her two youngest brothers aged 6 & 9 were evacuated to Easton on the Hill in Cambridgeshire. I can't imagine what it must have been like at such a young age to be taken away from your parents and sent to live with strangers. They were lucky insomuch as the family they were billeted with looked after them well, other children weren't so lucky. They went back there about 15 years ago and were trying to work out where they had stayed, and they chanced upon a local who just happened to be one of the sons of the people they had stayed with. My Uncle wrote a great article about his time as an evacuee, I'll try and dig it out and post it here.

Great stuff Pete. :thumbsup:
 

OldBlueLady

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I doubt it most of them would be dead by now.

Oh ha-di-ha Tony! :raspberry:
My Mothers side of our family were still in London and did not move to Southend until after my Uncle Jim was killed at Caen in July 1944. Her two youngest brothers aged 6 & 9 were evacuated to Easton on the Hill in Cambridgeshire. I can't imagine what it must have been like at such a young age to be taken away from your parents and sent to live with strangers. They were lucky insomuch as the family they were billeted with looked after them well, other children weren't so lucky. They went back there about 15 years ago and were trying to work out where they had stayed, and they chanced upon a local who just happened to be one of the sons of the people they had stayed with. My Uncle wrote a great article about his time as an evacuee, I'll try and dig it out and post it here.

Great stuff Pete. :thumbsup:

My mum was lucky, her aunt was in service (I think as the housekeeper) on a large country estate, her uncle worked there too and they had a daughter a similar age to my mum, so going there with her own mum for the war years was no hardship at all. I'll have to ask what her dad did while they were there, I'm sure he didn't go with them.

Very much enjoying the reads!
 

Tangled up in Blue

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I'll have to ask my dad what he did for school staying in town, ok, he was only a toddler when war broke out but he'd have been 7 or 8 by the end of it. I know at Westcliff High for Girls, there used to be 3 or 4 huge canvas pictures of the girls on their evacuation at Chapel in the Frith in Derbyshire. Wonder if they're still there.

Our mother was evacuated to Derbyshire during the early part of the war and she certainly wasn't a WHSG pupil.

She used to regale us with the expression: "Put wood in hole"* which she apparently learnt there.


*close the door.
 
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