• Welcome to the ShrimperZone forums.
    You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which only gives you limited access.

    Existing Users:.
    Please log-in using your existing username and password. If you have any problems, please see below.

    New Users:
    Join our free community now and gain access to post topics, communicate privately with other members, respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple and free. Click here to join.

    Fans from other clubs
    We welcome and appreciate supporters from other clubs who wish to engage in sensible discussion. Please feel free to join as above but understand that this is a moderated site and those who cannot play nicely will be quickly removed.

    Assistance Required
    For help with the registration process or accessing your account, please send a note using the Contact us link in the footer, please include your account name. We can then provide you with a new password and verification to get you on the site.

jaffa1

Manager
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
1,270
The Southend United youth system has worked wonders over recent years, producing a host of Football League players, including the likes of Charlton’s Franck Moussa, Burnley’s Michael Kightly, Cardiff’s Stuart O’Keefe, Wolves’ Dom Iorfa and a whole host of other young talents. Many, including Iorfa, alongside the likes of Dominic Poleon at Oldham and Isaac Hayden, the Arsenal youngster on loan at Hull, are snapped up by big clubs before they ever read the Shrimpers’ first team, but that is not the case for Jack Payne.
At just 21 years old and with over 70 first team appearances under his belt, the 5ft 5in forward is soon becoming one of the first names on Phil Brown’s team sheet for the first time since his emergence in 2013.
Brown was impressed with Payne as soon as he arrived at Roots Hall, immediately pushing for a place on the bench and signing his first professional deal in the summer of 2013. In August of that year he made his debut, featuring in a narrow 1-0 defeat to then Championship side Yeovil in the League Cup.
His first season was far from the fairy tale he would have hoped for, consistently inconsistent and often played in a much deeper midfield role than he is used to, Payne made fifteen appearances, including in important games such as an FA Cup third round tie against Hull City and a play-off second leg against Burton Albion, but the majority of those were from the bench. In fact, in that season, Payne failed to score and only tasted victory in two of his fifteen appearances, a remarkable record playing for a side who finished in 5th.
2014/15 was his breakthrough season, so much so that his emergence was voted as one of the highlights of the campaign in which the Blues won promotion. Payne was key to that, with his eight goals in 38 games, he became a vital member of the side in an attacking midfield role which saw him play just behind the striker or as an attacking midfielder. After a slow start, Payne grabbed his opportunity with both hands as he scored a brace and then scored in the penalty shoot-out as the team fell to defeat at the hands of AFC Wimbledon in the Johnstone’s Paint Trophy. That performance justified his place in the side, and he didn’t disappoint.

Deceivingly strong for a player of his height, Payne refuses to be bullied off of the ball and displays some of the best dribbling seen at Roots Hall in many years. His driving runs leave defences bamboozled with his pace and agility making him tough opposition for many lower league defenders.
Payne has a lot in his locker, the ability to finish from distance is a skill which has bailed Southend out time and time again, while Phil Brown has described him as the best penalty taker in the squad, as evidenced by his superb finish in the play-off final penalty shoot out in May. That day was also vital in showing Payne’s all round ability, dropping deep to superbly win the ball and set the Blues on one final counter attack, which finished up with Joe Pigott equalising in the 122nd minute.
Now into his third season, and wearing the number ten shirt which was vacated by Barry Corr’s departure, Payne has shown himself to be Southend’s very own mini-Messi. Playing not only in his preferred advanced position, but also out wide at times, Payne has defied all of the doubters with his superb performances which have already given him four goals in eighteen games, including composed finishes against the likes of Sheffield United and Coventry.
A mainstay in the team since November, Payne has proved himself to be one of the most important players in the Southend squad. With extending his contract on Phil Brown’s list of top priorities, Payne has a bright future ahead of him as he shows his quality having justified a first team place in League 1. At times this season, as in last season, Payne has been by far the most dangerous attacking and creative threat that the side can muster, and that continues to be the case as he has shown with his building up of partnerships with the experienced forwards Noel Hunt and Tyrone Barnett.
The youngster, who captained the Southend youth team before graduating to the first team, has found that his biggest weakness is in fact his surroundings. In a squad packed with holding and central midfielders, Payne is by far and away the best attacking midfielder but does not compete when put into a holding role where he lacks the aggression of a Gary Deegan style player. That means that when the going gets tough and Brown opts to protect a lead or go defensive, Payne is often the victim who is withdrawn for a more defensive minded player. There are few players of his type who could even be considered for such a role, but that he is is testament to Payne’s versatility and all round quality.
Payne undoubtedly has the quality to play at a high level, and after flourishing in League 2 last season, Southend’s promotion has come at just the right time as he has shown an improvement on his displays of last season this time around and whilst playing in a higher division and against far superior opposition. If Payne can continue his remarkable development, it would be hard to disagree that he could be a force at an even higher level, but one thing is for definite, and that is his vital importance to Southend as they continue to push for a play-off place in what is just their first season back in League 1 after a five year hiatus.
 

jaffa1

Manager
Joined
Nov 4, 2012
Messages
1,270
How long have you been is agent?

I' m not his agent, I'm his dad !! :smile:

In all seriousness, I've always felt I could 'spot' a youngster. I picked out 3 kids when I first saw them play back in the day, one was called Ince, one Gascoigne and the other Bradshaw (possibly my only 'failure', tho he did go on to play for Sheff Wed in the top division). It only took a couple of minutes of watching Payne in a youth game to know he'd be more than a good'un.
 

Beefy

Life President
Joined
Oct 27, 2003
Messages
18,901
Location
Old Leigh
Slip's being a bit generous claiming that a few of those names were products of the SUFC youth setup.
 
Top