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pickledseal

cowboy
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Messages
4,933
Location
Upminster
This would be an interesting move.... <link>

I loved this quote:
‎"When he [Gove] declined to attend, I began to reflect on why and thought that, from his point of view, it was probably the equivalent of a pupil being invited to meet their form teacher for a review of their behaviour and they know the news isn't going to be good... Michael has had one success. In 12 months, he has managed to generate the levels of dissatisfaction among teachers that it took the last Tory Government 18 years to achieve. Now, at the NASUWT, we don't like to give up on anybody, but I am afraid state education is just not right for Michael. I think a managed move might be on the cards."

I do thing that general contentment amongst teachers, as with many public sector workers, must be at record low in recent times.

Now before we get into "public sector workers don't know how good they've got it" debate - and realistically there are some things I really can't complain about having got a new job yesterday that all in will give me a £10k or so payrise - it is more directed at the fact that the more I hear, the more out of touch I think the Education policey of the coalition is clueless!

Yesterday's news - <link> - that gives a head a term to decide to sack a teacher scares me! It does feel like we have all been given our final warning from September. I agree something needs to be done about inadequate teachers... but this is open to heads bullying out staff, and once sacked it is hard to ever go back. Most teachers would like to be better, and given support, help and further training they would probably be better. I also think a happy teacher is a better performing teacher!

I'm not sure I'll start on pensions too - that is a whole other debate! I just wish the government would at least follow the law (they have already changed our pensions to being linked with RPI to CPI, a loss of approx 1% - and contributions will rise from end of June, about £80 more a month for me - without actually valuing the pensions, working out the sustainability of pensions and going through the legal consulting process - Labour actually did, and changed in 2007). Should be interesting to see how much public support there will be come 30th June when we all go on strike...

In an interesting twist on this, my new job is at one of the first Catholic academy's in this part of the world. I've always been against academies but somehow they managed to convince me on Tuesday that nothing will be different.

Wow, glad to get all that off my chest.
 

Neil_F

Coach
Joined
Jul 5, 2007
Messages
848
Location
Islington
I loved this quote:

The Coalition policies are about empowering users of the education system. It is hardly surprising that the monopoly producer disapproves.

that gives a head a term to decide to sack a teacher scares me! It does feel like we have all been given our final warning from September. I agree something needs to be done about inadequate teachers... but this is open to heads bullying out staff, and once sacked it is hard to ever go back.

Those of us in the private sector have a notice period of one month. If a teacher thinks they have been dismissed unfairly then they can bring a case of unfair dismissal against their former employer, just as anyone else can. Why should bad teachers be protected?

I'm not sure I'll start on pensions too

Public sector pensions are an unsustainable expense to the taxpayer. Why should a graduate in 2030, with a student debt of £40k, be funding a teacher's final salary pension? The private sector has virtually eliminated final salary pension schemes so you're lucky to have a defined benefit accrual preserved.

Should be interesting to see how much public support there will be come 30th June when we all go on strike...

Well, this member of the public will see it as the teaching unions placing their own interests above those of the children they are supposed to be teaching, even though standards are declining as measured by international league tables.
 

pickledseal

cowboy
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Messages
4,933
Location
Upminster
The Coalition policies are about empowering users of the education system. It is hardly surprising that the monopoly producer disapproves.

Empowering which users? Essentially it will create a divided system of some fantastic schools where the middle/upper will flourish as they work systems to get their kids into. on the other hand there will be awful places where little learning takes place. Market forces in Education have huge potential to do this (look what league tables did). Also is it not best to at least consult with stake holders? Give almost seems to have a policy of not ever speaking to teachers or school leaders... Even it seems at conferences to explain and justify his policy.



Those of us in the private sector have a notice period of one month. If a teacher thinks they have been dismissed unfairly then they can bring a case of unfair dismissal against their former employer, just as anyone else can. Why should bad teachers be protected?

Define a bad teacher. It is incredibly subjective, is it on results? Discipline in their class? Methods?

Also look at how many teachers have to have 'time out' on false accusations and return to the classroom... An unfair dismissal may be found but a teachers career ruined'

Public sector pensions are an unsustainable expense to the taxpayer. Why should a graduate in 2030, with a student debt of £40k, be funding a teacher's final salary pension? The private sector has virtually eliminated final salary pension schemes so you're lucky to have a defined benefit accrual preserved.

IF it is unsustainable. There 2007 review changed certain things and took into account the agony population. Wouldn't it be best to see HOW unsustainable it is first? As required by law? When we find out how bad it is then we can decide what needs doing instead of cheap, easy shots not backed up by evidence. Incidentally I'm not against a career av scheme - would be fairer.

Well, this member of the public will see it as the teaching unions placing their own interests above those of the children they are supposed to be teaching, even though standards are declining as measured by international league tables.

So waiting until exams are finished even though it may be too late by then is selfish? Also you won't raise standards by ****ing off the entire workforce.

On iPhone so hard to fully articulate myself - sorry!
 

MattE

Manager⭐
Joined
Aug 8, 2005
Messages
2,399
Empowering which users? Essentially it will create a divided system of some fantastic schools where the middle/upper will flourish as they work systems to get their kids into. on the other hand there will be awful places where little learning takes place.

Isn't that pretty much what we have now?
 
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