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Slipperduke

The Camden Cad
Joined
Aug 24, 2004
Messages
4,333
Location
North London
Who would you rather be this summer? Multi-billionaire owner of Chelsea, Roman Abramovich or reasonably wealthy owner of Everton, Bill Kenwright. Think carefully before you choose, there's more to this than meets the eye.

Kenwright may have left Wembley empty-handed on Saturday night, but at least his future seems relatively calm. After showing faith in the initially inconsistent performances of his manager, he now has one of the most stable football clubs in the country. David Moyes flirted with relegation in his second full season in charge, but Kenwright wasn't concerned. He knew that sometimes you have to take a quick step backwards in order to make a great leap forwards. His faith was rewarded with a top four finish the next season. Now Everton are strong and organised with a string of youngsters breaking into the first team. They may not have the resources to compete on a level playing field with the cash-bloated members of the big four, but that won't stop them trying. The future is bright.

Abramovich, by comparison, is still to decide upon the identity of his fifth manager in under two years. Whoever takes over will have to contend with an ageing squad of players who have seen it all, done it all and bought shares in the t-shirt factory. The only manager they have truly respected since the departure of Jose Mourinho was the outgoing interim boss Guus Hiddink, who they have publicly begged to stay. Whoever the new manager is, he has some very big shoes to fill and he will have to work under the knowledge that even second place has not been enough to save his predecessors. To make matters worse, he will have to introduce some fresh blood to the squad to replace the old and the weary. Of their starting eleven at Wembley, just two players were signed after Mourinho's departure. How long can they continue with his team? Ricardo Carvalho's struggles for fitness have been as concerning as Michael Ballack's increasingly casual attempts to dictate the play and Didier Drogba's self-defeating fragility.

Chelsea's youth policy has been so shambolic that, unlike Everton, they haven't got a next generation to call upon.No-one knows if the youngsters are good enough because, with the exception of Michael Mancienne, no-one has been given a chance to prove themselves. That means a trip to the transfer market where prices are higher than ever. Given that Chelsea haven't come close to making a profit since Abramovich's first day, it will require an injection of cash similar to the crazy summer spending spree of 2003. Back then, the Russian oligarch was very clear that he would invest heavilly, put a structure into place that would generate profit and then allow the club to run itself. It hasn't happened like that, has it?

So think again about whose seat you'd rather be sat in this summer. Everton have, like last season, enjoyed a fine campaign with their excellent manager and there's nothing to suggest that next season will be any different. Chelsea, for the second summer in a row, have no manager and no clear direction. They will have to spend big just to stand still. All in all, I'd rather spend my summer on the blue half of Merseyside.
 

EastStandBlue

Life President
Joined
May 29, 2005
Messages
15,477
Chelsea's youth policy has been so shambolic that, unlike Everton, they haven't got a next generation to call upon.No-one knows if the youngsters are good enough because, with the exception of Michael Mancienne, no-one has been given a chance to prove themselves. That means a trip to the transfer market where prices are higher than ever.

Aye...

While I was researching for my article on youth football, I found that Chelsea, JT aside even though he actually came from West Ham at an early age, produce one of the fewest numbers of youth products in the Premiership.

If you look at all 20 Prem clubs, they all have a number of youth products in their squad. Not Chelsea.

Abramovich's response was to close the scouting network this year and plough the finance saved into the Academy. Now, Roman of past wouldn't have acted so stringently, he would've just kept the scouting network running and bankrolled the Academy developments through the sale of one of his yachts.

Chelsea are close to signing Zhirkov, a great acquisition but not what they actually need... They already have depths of talent on the wings, it's in the centre where they need to spend the most money. If Ancelotti brings Kaka with him, it'll paper over the cracks for the sum of £100m+ and a wage which will make him the highest paid player on the planet.

I just can't see Chelsea matching United and Liverpool next season, or the season after that as it goes, without some serious financial outlay.
 
Joined
May 18, 2008
Messages
487
Location
Manchester
Abramovich's problems are of his own making. His biggest problem is that he doesn't understand football. He seems to think if you splash the cash you're guaranteed success. Sure, money buys good players but ultimately, if you want success, you need to hire a good manager and give him time and the ability to determine the club's direction.

If I was Abramovich, I'd have recognised as Mourinho was one of the best managers (if not the best) in the world, I should probably let him do what he does best and give him time. Bit late for that now though...
 
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