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Youth unemployment hits record levels

OldBlueLady

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Tell me about it. And yet I am expected to provide a home for my two (16 and 18) whilst himself swans off in the distance. No moral obligations at all.
 

Hotman

reason, honour, integrity
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Tell me about it. And yet I am expected to provide a home for my two (16 and 18) whilst himself swans off in the distance. No moral obligations at all.
Rather than moaning on here, take it to the CSA / divorce courts.
 

Pubey

Guest
Send them out to work.

but there are no jobs.

where I say jobs, I mean ones for young people with limited skills and experience who expect to walk in on over £20,000. Plenty of low paid jobs around...
 

Tangled up in Blue

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Sant Cugat del Vallès
Tell me about it. And yet I am expected to provide a home for my two (16 and 18) whilst himself swans off in the distance. No moral obligations at all.

Personally,I worried about our 17 year old, who's leaving school this year.I'm sure(or at least I fervently hope)that she'll do well in her final Bac. exams but it's a tough world out there, as I know, from the stories I hear from my students at the UAB.
 

OldBlueLady

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Rather than moaning on here, take it to the CSA / divorce courts.


Yep, spent 5 and a half hours there yesterday thanks. ******* pays me until the youngest is 18, regardless of the fact I'll have to home them for the indefinate future - that's till May 2012 cos he's spent a year and a half avoiding things and meantime it's cost me thousands. Legal system is fatally flawed when it disregards past conduct.
 

Mad Cyril

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How many employers are looking for people who's primary skills are playing rap music through mobile phone speakers and swearing a lot?
 

OldBlueLady

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Thank you for revealing your angst, the details of which have been passed to the Jeremy Kyle Show. In the meantime, what are your views on youth unemployment?
That it needs tackling, too many slip through the net. All goes back to being frequently made to feel worthless in senior school, and just living up (or down) to that label.
 

Mad Cyril

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That it needs tackling, too many slip through the net. All goes back to being frequently made to feel worthless in senior school, and just living up (or down) to that label.

It could be worse. At least kids in the Uk aren't born into a life of subsistence where adults are lucky to have dodged curable diseases and survive childhood.
 

OldBlueLady

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It could be worse. At least kids in the Uk aren't born into a life of subsistence where adults are lucky to have dodged curable diseases and survive childhood.

Of course, but then we probably wouldn't be sharing our worries on a website either.
 

chadded

Not striking since 2004
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When I was 12, I was doing paper rounds, and making the money I later ****ed down the urinal of the Spread. As soon as I'd finished my GCSE's, I'd got myself 2 Saturday jobs. As soon as I was old enough, I joined up (Adult entry), and left home. Not suggesting anyone follows my path, but since I was 12, I was driven to making my own money, and not scrounging off my parents.

Youth unemployment isn't nice, but half the problem is the youth's who just accept it, because scrounging off of Mummy and Daddy is easy.
 

* ORM *

Emma Bunton's No. 1 stalker, Adam Barretts No. 1 f
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This is what happens when you turn around to teachers and say there is no need to correct pupils grammar and spelling mistakes, combined with a me, me, me, borrow now,pay later society which tells youths Universities are the way to go. Universities are for the elite, not just an excuse to bum around for a few extra years then start whingeing about the debt you have to pay back.

I think it makes much more sense to ban entry into Uni until the age of 21. From leaving school until then you have the chance to further your education at college or get into the real world for 2 to 3 years then make an informed decision, possibly with some money behind you, about whether you really do want to go to Uni. This enforced break and engagement with real life for a few years would also make better teachers.
 

OldBlueLady

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This is what happens when you turn around to teachers and say there is no need to correct pupils grammar and spelling mistakes, combined with a me, me, me, borrow now,pay later society which tells youths Universities are the way to go. Universities are for the elite, not just an excuse to bum around for a few extra years then start whingeing about the debt you have to pay back.

I think it makes much more sense to ban entry into Uni until the age of 21. From leaving school until then you have the chance to further your education at college or get into the real world for 2 to 3 years then make an informed decision, possibly with some money behind you, about whether you really do want to go to Uni. This enforced break and engagement with real life for a few years would also make better teachers.

Yet again I find myself agreeing with you, those years between 16 and 21 are very important because I think they help shape you. Of course, everyone wants to get out there and have a good time but that has to be balanced against learning to be a responsible young adult. If there was some kind of scheme that allowed non academic post GCSE youngsters to be given the chance to spend 2 years in a varied apprenticeship taster scheme, where they were nominally funded, then there might not be so many dissatisfied youngsters out there. They could experience different trades hands on, maybe for a period of 3 months at a time, with some kind of certification at the end which might then have some bearing on them finding a job in that sector. Alternatively, for the real wasters who just want to get out there and on benefits, there should be required "voluntary" work, like litter picking for example. Personally, I still advocate some kind of 2 year National Service - too many people have completely the wrong attitudes....the "me, me, me" that ORM mentions.

When I look back to how my friends and I were, at 18, we were all working - many of us in the city - and most of us walked into jobs fairly easily, but, we all had pretty decent "O" or "A" levels. If you leave school with nothing now, there really aren't many options. Even if you get good results, it's nowhere near as easy as it used to be.

When I was 12, I was doing paper rounds, and making the money I later ****ed down the urinal of the Spread. As soon as I'd finished my GCSE's, I'd got myself 2 Saturday jobs. As soon as I was old enough, I joined up (Adult entry), and left home. Not suggesting anyone follows my path, but since I was 12, I was driven to making my own money, and not scrounging off my parents.

Youth unemployment isn't nice, but half the problem is the youth's who just accept it, because scrounging off of Mummy and Daddy is easy.
I admire anyone who can be that focussed, I really wish I knew how I could have got my son to think a bit more like that. He worked hard in his young teens, doing quite difficult paper rounds and extras when called on, as well as helping in the shop and worked hard for 6 weeks full time before being let go as his self employment certification hadn't come through which didn't help. He's had full time work and full time money, you'd have thought he would want that back unfortunately, his peer group aren't the best of role models.
 
Last edited:
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As several other esteemed posters have implied, the main problem lies with an education culture that refuses to give the little darlings the smallest dose of reality. They genuinely believe that a couple of GCSEs in soft subjects will get them through the door of a top merchant bank, when the only heights they are truly ready to reach are the top shelves at Tesco. Minimum wage jobs exist for people with minimum skill levels - the hoodied masses need to be made to realise that.
 

Hotman

reason, honour, integrity
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Messages
5,611
Location
Not here
Yet again I find myself agreeing with you, those years between 16 and 21 are very important because I think they help shape you. Of course, everyone wants to get out there and have a good time but that has to be balanced against learning to be a responsible young adult. If there was some kind of scheme that allowed non academic post GCSE youngsters to be given the chance to spend 2 years in a varied apprenticeship taster scheme, where they were nominally funded, then there might not be so many dissatisfied youngsters out there. They could experience different trades hands on, maybe for a period of 3 months at a time, with some kind of certification at the end which might then have some bearing on them finding a job in that sector. Alternatively, for the real wasters who just want to get out there and on benefits, there should be required "voluntary" work, like litter picking for example. Personally, I still advocate some kind of 2 year National Service - too many people have completely the wrong attitudes....the "me, me, me" that ORM mentions.

When I look back to how my friends and I were, at 18, we were all working - many of us in the city - and most of us walked into jobs fairly easily, but, we all had pretty decent "O" or "A" levels. If you leave school with nothing now, there really aren't many options. Even if you get good results, it's nowhere near as easy as it used to be.


I admire anyone who can be that focussed, I really wish I knew how I could have got my son to think a bit more like that. He worked hard in his young teens, doing quite difficult paper rounds and extras when called on, as well as helping in the shop and worked hard for 6 weeks full time before being let go as his self employment certification hadn't come through which didn't help. He's had full time work and full time money, you'd have thought he would want that back unfortunately, his peer group aren't the best of role models.

Maybe seeing his mum moan about his dad and his friends on the internet hasn't helped? xx
 

Hotman

reason, honour, integrity
Joined
Apr 12, 2006
Messages
5,611
Location
Not here
As several other esteemed posters have implied, the main problem lies with an education culture that refuses to give the little darlings the smallest dose of reality. They genuinely believe that a couple of GCSEs in soft subjects will get them through the door of a top merchant bank, when the only heights they are truly ready to reach are the top shelves at Tesco. Minimum wage jobs exist for people with minimum skill levels - the hoodied masses need to be made to realise that.

True, but there is also a false belief that a basket weaving degree is actually valuable to someone - the education system needs to stream students between the naturally gifted and the rest, and ensure that the rest are fully aware of the kind of job open to them.
 
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