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Slipperduke

The Camden Cad
Joined
Aug 24, 2004
Messages
4,333
Location
North London
http://www.animalinyou.com/survey.asp


When I worked at The Independent we used this personality test on ten people in the office and it was pretty much spot-on in every case. It only asks a handful of questions, so God knows how it works.

Anywhere, here's me. I'm a rooster!


Roosters are those talented, creative, but somewhat eccentric people who make life interesting for the rest of us. Their bird-like minds are always on the lookout for stimulation and roosters display the characteristically high-energy behavior of their species. They are artistic, creative, and sophisticated with a thorough knowledge of fine wines, cooking, writing, theater and painting. Subscribing to the early bird maxim, roosters rise a little earlier than their competition and could even be accused of having their fingers in too many pies. For the world is so fascinating to the rooster, that settling down into any one career would be impossibly constricting. Unfortunately, their earning potential can suffer in a competitive world that rewards specialization. But, roosters will succeed when they choose a career that presents a variety of challenges, such as medicine, publishing, journalism, or acting.

There's a touch of glamour in everything the rooster does -- for settling for less would be exasperating to the rooster's essence. Why take the train if you can fly? This philosophy pervades its personal life, for the rooster proves to be a perfectionist in the bedroom too. Of course, roosters are not above crowing a little, if they feel that their efforts have gone unnoticed. But in the long run, partners have few complaints holding their rooster lover in the highest regard as paramour.

Their ideal mates include peacocks who are attracted to their strong demeanor and flashy style. They are incorrigible flirts and although successful in attracting mates, their egos sometimes drive potential partners away. When sufficiently motivated by the right partner however, the rooster will generally find a way to make the relationship work.

As a parent, it is fussy and attentive. Like the proverbial brooding hen, it is involved with every aspect of its children's lives; including their dress and company they keep; some even accuse the rooster of being overprotective. Although its children might resent their parent's interference, they learn to appreciate their concerns as they mature. The more reserved animal personalities such as bats, bison and moles find them to be fussy and bossy, and snake and canine personalities should be studiously avoided.

A rooster will not be silent while there's breath in its body and although its powerful voice tends to be on the shrill side -- when it calls for action, everyone responds. Fuelled by resentment of their brazen style, these saucy birds hear a lot of unkind remarks from members of their own species and these barbs tear at their self-esteem. But when things look bleak, they stick to their guns, redouble their efforts, and live by the motto: if at first you don't suck seed, try drier grain.
 
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